The Arduous Trust

George Washington used this phrase in his farewell address on September 19, 1796. Ever humble and gracious, he speaks with dignity and a deep devotion for the young nation. He says of the Constitution,

"…I shall carry it with me to my grave, as a strong incitement to unceasing vows that heaven may continue to you the choicest tokens of its beneficence; that your union and brotherly affection may be perpetual; that the free Constitution, which is the work of your hands, may be sacredly maintained; that its administration in every department may be stamped with wisdom and virtue; that, in fine, the happiness of the people of these States, under the auspices of liberty, may be made complete by so careful a preservation and so prudent a use of this blessing as will acquire to them the glory of recommending it to the applause, the affection, and adoption of every nation which is yet a stranger to it…"

3 Comments

  1. bibomedia said,

    February 29, 2008 at 6:35 am

    :)

  2. March 25, 2008 at 12:06 pm

    […] is not about the man (or woman), it is about the NATION. George Washington once called it “The Arduous Trust.” The framers and founders of America used the tenderest words and phrases in describing the […]

  3. May 23, 2008 at 3:06 pm

    […] Washington said of the Constitution in his farewell address …the free Constitution, which is the work of your hands, may be sacredly maintained; that its […]


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